data


Climate change: Feeling the heat but keeping it cool

People feel differently about climate change depending on where they live. Taking data from 194 European regions, this column presents a staggering paradox: people living in regions most affected by rising temperatures are less concerned about climate change and show surprising optimism about its reversibility. In contrast, inhabitants of colder regions exhibit more pessimism. Examining migration patterns and regional priorities provides potential explanations for this surprising fact. The most affected regions in the study are also those facing acute economic and financial challenges, which might explain why climate change is not prioritised. The most pessimistic and concerned individuals may have also already migrated, leaving behind an optimistic population in the regions most at risk.

Sailing with Artificial Intelligence: Recommendation systems and digital markets

In this complex digital age, people’s lives are greatly simplified by recommendation systems – AI algorithms that make it easier for online users to find the things they like in a vast ocean of options. These systems have profound impacts on individuals’ decisions and market outcomes. On one hand, they provide a higher match value than when individuals autonomously engage in a costly search for their preferred items. On the other hand, they lead to substantial market concentration and prompt sellers to raise their prices. Although our research generally indicates a positive net effect, the complex influence of these AI tools on economic outcomes requires careful examination and understanding.

Measuring health outcomes: A new approach

Measuring people’s health status is vital for designing effective policies that support different age groups. But economists working in this field face a difficult challenge when it comes to integrating accurate health measures into their economic models. This then makes it difficult for policy-makers to make straightforward model-based decisions. This column offers a new metric and seeks to solve the issue of measuring health statuses and their associated economic outcomes. The new approach makes integrating important health data into economic models easier, helping yield more accurate results.